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Minor Program

Minor Program and Areas of Concentration

The minor program is structured into six areas of concentration: Ancient Judaism, Jewish History: Modern and Contemporary, Holocaust Studies, Judaic Literature and Language, Jewish Religion and Philosophy and Modern Israel.

For additional information, call (410) 455-8639 or email Dr. Michele Osherow (mosherow@umbc.edu).  

Requirements

The minor in Judaic studies requires a minimum of 18 credits. This requirement can be fulfilled in several ways:

  • By taking at least nine credits from one area of concentration, and nine more credits from the same or another area of concentration. Included among the courses listed in each Area of Concentration are courses approved by the Judaic Studies Advisory Committee, which are listed each semester, as they are offered, in the Judaic Studies section of the Schedule of Classes, including JDST 400: Special Study or Project.
  • By taking a survey of Judaic studies that includes at least one course from each of five areas of concentration. Selection of the courses should be made with guidance of an academic advisor.

Fine print: At least 12 of the 18 credits of the minor must be from courses that bear the HEBR or JDST acronym. At least six credits of the minor must be from upper level courses, and at least nine credits of the minor must be from courses taken at UMBC. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in all courses applied toward the minor.

Areas of Concentration Curricula:

Courses in Ancient Judaism
Israel and the Ancient Near East (JDST 200)
Introduction to the Bible – TaNaKH (JDST 230)
Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Hillel (JDST 201)
Introduction to Ancient Egypt (ANCS 110)
The Archaeology of the Land of Israel (ARCH 320)
Masterpieces of Ancient Literature (ANCS 204)
Septuagint (GREK 350)

Courses in Jewish History: Modern and Contemporary
History of the Jews in Modern Times (JDST 273)
Contemporary Jewish History (JDST 274)
History of the Jews in the United States (JDST 370)
Modern Israel (JDST 310)
The American Jewish Experience in Film (JDST 371)
Ethnic Groups in America (HIST 315)
Eastern Europe since 1878 (HIST 378)
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Middle Ages (HIST 463)
German History, 1789-1914 (HIST 483)
German History, 1914 to Present (HIST 484)
Russia to 1900 (HIST 485)
Soviet History on Trial (HIST 486)
Europe, 1815-1914 (HIST 487)
Europe, 1914 to the Present (HIST 488)
Religious Influences in American Life (RLST 315)
Sociology of Religion (SOCY 349)

Courses in Holocaust Studies
Contemporary Jewish History (JDST 274)
Origins of Anti-Semitism (JDST 340)
History of the Holocaust (JDST 373)
Literature of the Holocaust (JDST 320)
Europe, 1914 to the Present (HIST 488)
German History, 1914 to the Present (HIST 484)
The Holocaust: Social Psychological Perspectives*

Courses in Jewish Literature and Language
Introduction to the Bible – TaNaKH (JDST 230)
Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Hillel (JDST 201)
Jewish Writing in World Literature (JDST 321)
Literature of the Holocaust (JDST 320)
A Survey of Modern Hebrew Literature (JDST 323)
Masterpieces of Ancient Literature (ANCS 204)
The Bible and Literature (ENGL 349)
Septuagint (GREK 350)
Modern Hebrew (HEBR 101-202)
Advanced Hebrew I (HEBR 301)
Advanced Hebrew II (HEBR 302)
Selected Hebrew Authors (HEBR 323)
American Jewish Literature and Drama*

Courses in Jewish Religion and Philosophy
Introduction to Judaic Studies (JDST 100)
Introduction to the Bible – TaNaKH (JDST 230)
Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Hillel (JDST 201)
Jewish Ethics (JDST 330)
Philosophy of Religion (PHIL 210)
Introduction to Comparative Religion (RLST 220)

Courses in Modern Israel
History of the Jews in the Modern Period (JDST 273)
Contemporary Jewish History (JDST 274)
Modern Israel (JDST 310)
Modern Israel in Film (JDST 311)
Dynamics of the Arab-Israeli Conflict (JDST 410)
Middle East International Relations (POLI 486)
Modern Hebrew (HEBR 101-202)
Advanced Hebrew I (HEBR 301)
Advanced Hebrew II (HEBR 302)
History of the Holocaust (JDST 373)

* Courses to be proposed

Evening Option

One or two courses usually are offered in the evening each semester. However, not all courses are offered on an evening basis.